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AG88导航网【ag88.shop】二八杠游戏网 12meV4e7COVID-19【: World ec\o\no/my in 2020 \to suffer \worst year since 1930s G/【reat \Dep】res】s【ion, says IMF【xZyX

5ufUText sizeAaAaThe d/ebate arou\nd the sustainability of le\a【ther p\rodu】ction is g【ai/ning m【omentum in th【】e fashion/【 industry. In 】recent y【ears, ra/ising awareness around the\ ecological impact o】f producin/g le】athe】r i/tems】 has prompt\ed a gro【w】】ing number of brands to rec\onside】r their u【se of the fa【bri】c in】 th】e/ir fashio【n lines/, as well as it has【 pushe/d new actors to \co】me up w\ith innovative solutions to creat\e more ecol【og\ically-【fr/】iendly le\ather/.The ec】ologica【l cost of leather productio】nT/he initial r】aw\ material for l\eather 【producti】/on is animal【 skin\ which orig【inates from ani】mal farming, a pro】ce\ss w\h【ich】 【usually rel】ie【s on huge amounts of feed, pasturel/and【, water, and】 fossil fuels with ne/gative ecologic\al impacts. However, leathe【r /is 】on】l】y a by-pro/duct in thi】s process, the animals being primarily raised for their me\【at/.Where/ the e【nvir【onmental cos/t of leat】her product\io\n really beco】mes visibl【e is at the /stage of the\ transformatio【n of the animal skin into the f】inal prod/uct. Since /leather is a perishable material, a number 】of methods have been used to st【abi【//lise t\【he raw mate【ri\al, and make it m\ore durable via t/h【e tanning process.This 】】is an indus【trial process that【 typically involves 【many ch\e】mical com】pounds and uses up a lot of water and energy. A number of hazardous mat\eri/】als a\nd /p】ollutants are/ releas\ed i】n 】the envir【onmen【t s\uch 【as mineral salts, lime slud】ge, sulfides, fo\rmaldeh\yd\e, coal-tar de/ri【vatives, a】nd various oil【s, dyes, and finishes (some o/f them cyani【de-bas【ed) are employed. . Water \i】s u【sed in】 high quantit】【y as a s/olvent, which is all the more problematic that a significa【nt n【umbe\r of tan【neries/ are lo【cate】\d in ar\id regions \of the world.To a】ddress these i【ssues, \the dev\elopment of new technologies t【o\ 】provide】 more ef【fici\ent processes for【 the pr\oduction of le】ather【 is under】way. So are efforts to promote the production of synth】etic leath\e\r, /w/hi】c/h could offer an interes【ting【】 alternative to th【e fas/hi【on indu【stry.Cow lea】\ther vs synthetic leatherFor 】change 】to happe】n in the leather i/ndustry tho】ugh, rob/ust assessme/nts of t\he/ dif/feren】t m】ethods us\ed in the ta【nn】ing process/ and compari\sons betw【ee\n cow lea】ther an\d other materi】als, are ne【ed\ed.Researchers have assessed the e【cological impact of different ta【nning methods to se【e if on【e was prefe】rable in t【】erms of its environment/al footprint.】 One o】f the techniques 【that some tanneries \employ to reduce the u【se\ of harmful che】micals is to 】resort to vege/table-tann【i【ng.This is an artisanal process that tak/【es advantage of /the t】an【ni\c acids na【】turally found i/】【】n some pl\】ants, by using the/ barks, branches,】 lea【ves or even s】\ome fruits in s/ome specific te\chniques. 【It is /【t\houg【ht to be more 【environmental/ly friendly than oth/e/r methods of processing /cow l\eather.To find out more,/ a 2017 stu【dy comp【a\r/ed this 【m【eth/o/d to more t\radit\ional 【methods using chemi】\cals suc\h a【\【s c/hromium-】/tanning, looking at th\e carbon, water, and energy 【footprint o\f the vege】\table】 】and chromium leather pro】ces/sing 】technology in 12 selecte/d tanneries in seven dif/ferent coun】/tries worldwide.The scientists act【【u】a【lly fo【und no sign/if【ican】t d\iff【erences in the fo【otpr【int of vegetabl/】e 】and chromium leather processes. Ho【wever, they cauti】on that this type of research is /challenging to do and /that tak/i】ng steps to improve the leather ind/ustry need to be base\d\ on evidence\-based resea\r【ch.“\Each tannery proved to be 【very individual, a\nd the\refore 】att【empting to pe/rform this type of analysis /without si【mply producin/g【 meaningle【ss generalities is 【a cha\llenge\ f【or companies, researcher\s, and regulator/s,&r】dquo; the 】researchers say. While【 /there is/\ little evide\nce \then that cho】osing a spec\ific m【ethod of leather tanning may be 【bette\r fo【】r the environment, \the evidence in favour of producing syntheti\c lea\ther ins】tead of leat】【her from /an\imals i\s mounting.Th】e 201】【 Pulse of T【he 】Fash/ion Industry Report published by the Global】 Fashion Agenda and The Bos/ton Con/\s】ult【ing Grou/p, was instrumental in highlig【ht【ing the\ idea that the prod】uctio/n/ of 】synthetic leather i\s less d】amaging /to the \environment/. It offer/ed 【some \of th【e most robus【t 】conclusions 【o】n th/e subject to date,】 p【ro】mpting\ 【stake】holders in the】 fashion indus/t\ry to switch to more ecological options, including synthetic leat【he】r【.Th】e /rep】o【rt indee\d/ showed \that among /all the materia】ls used in the fashion \ind】ustry, an】imal leather ranked thi【rd as the main contributor to global\/ warmi\ng. I【t also came first as the 【most damaging mat【erial/ when resea\rchers looked 【at th\】e issue of eutrophicat【】ion : its man【ufa】ctu【re was【 associated w】ith a relea/se of excessive chemical compounds and nu/trients/ into bodi【es of w】ater, frequently due to runoff from】 th【e land, causing\ dense growth of plant l\if【e\ and deat\/h /of 】anima【l\ life from lack of 【oxygen.More impor】tantl【y, the report found that synthetic leather /had on average on】ly /【a third of the environme】n】tal \impact of【【 cow leather. 】Switching to/ alternative materi】\【/a\/ls, including synthetic leather【, could thus directl\y improve a p\roduct&rs【quo;s 】ecological foot/prin】t.Gro】wing number of initiativesThe \mes【s【age【 has progressively\ been recei\ved\ and a growing numbe\r of initiatives i/llustrat】e the mo/ve to abandon cow l】eath】er for its synt】hetic a【lternatives. Exa\mples of a\dva/nces rely o【n the development a】nd the us【e of non/-convent/iona/【l fib/e\rs made fr【om substances /su【ch as c/itrus/ juice, grape 】plan/ts, or kelp, bioengin/eered \/leather, and the furt】her【 /promotion of bast f【ibers.In its m】】o/st re\ce/nt 2018 edition, the Pulse of Th【e Fashion In/dustry Report presen【te\d a num\ber of projects carri/ed by companies dedicated to su\stainable fashion and t【o pro/ducing synthetic【 le【at【her at the lowest ecological c/ost.Mi\lan-based compa【ny Vegea \is fo\r in【stance working to crea【te leather that is 】m/a【de entirely fr【o【m【】 grapes skin, stalks, an\d seeds and for th/is, it【 won th【e 20】17 H&M Global Change Award. Another good e\xa【【mple is the company known 【a】s 【Provenance Biofabrics which pr】oduces b】ioengineere【d leather【 by pr】ogramming /collagen molec】ules to self-assem\ble.These are 】just some of the initiative【s/ under d\eve【lopment, \and the f/i】eld is now undergoing a period of inno】】va【】tion and dynamism】. /Exactly】 what 2019 will bring is 【uncle【ar】, \b【ut one thing is cer【tain\ : the leather industry 【is/\ profoundly changing to b/ecome more sustainable.Writer: L\éa Su【rugueShare th】is article 【 】 More from stylelrY7

vgCBText sizeAaAaWalking】 along the shore of the Dead Sea give【\【s you a c\lear vision of how 【qui\/ckly【 na/ture \reacts to】 human intervention. The\ Dead S/ea h/as been dying for de\cades,\ and】 the result is \al/ready obv】ious.Nestled betwee】n Israel and the Palestinian T【erritories 】and /Jordan, /the Dead Sea has been le\aving its mark /【【on mankind since biblical times. Famous for its extreme sa】】linity, /an/ Israeli a】r/tist 【has even】 been i【nsp【ired by that and use t/he\ expanse as【 her stu】dio\ to create cry/stal art pi\eces.Since the histori【cal lake has be【en exploited by modern indus】try, the【 wate【r】 】level is【 g】radually lowering. T【he m【iner/al extraction and the diversio\n of the \Riv/er Jord【an&r\s】/quo;s/ water /have been\ big c/ontributors to the phenom】enon.】As the sp\ectacularly shrinki\ng wat\er level leaves it】s mar】k on the shore,\ d\angerous sinkholes appear al【ong the lake - the 】】result of \the br】iny wat/e\r r/ecedin/g unde【rgrou】nd. /In 199【0 th】e】re were a little 】over 100/ sinkholes, accordi\ng to the Geological/ Survey o\f Israel. Today the】re are more t/】h/an【 6,000. This led 【to the n】ecessary clo/【sure【\ of some s【hore seg【ments hence those tourist spots became ghost to】】wns.Click on th】e video above \to learn more ab】out what happens with the Dead/ S】【【ea.Share this【 article 】 More\ from plac/es0juwPN2r

qFwlText siz】eAaAaThese days, paying to \plan/t trees or inves】ting in g/reen projects as】 a way 】to balan\ce out your carbon emissions is a pretty stan\dard method o】f easing your en【vironm【ental conscienc】e. K/nown as car【bon offsettin\g, the process /has spawned a thriving business 】mak/i\ng billions of euros every year as com【panie【s /trade c】\a/】r【\bon credit\s to reach cli\mate c/hange g\oals.Yo/u can 】now even 】offset to und/o you\r own 】personal envi\r】onmenta\l damage, with a\irlines and organisat【ions offering /to he/lp you tak/e full resp【onsibi】l【ity】 for yo/ur 【residual emissions. For/ a small fee, o【/f \c/】\ourse. I【ncreasingly, however【, this s/ustain/ability】【 sol】u\t】io\n has come under】 fi【r】e from activists as being 】little\ more than/ gr【ee/n【washing. Criti【c/s have comp【ared【 \it to the practice of/ selli【ng indulgences\ /in the ancient Ca\tholic church; you can live\ h/ow】 you want as】 long as y【ou ha【ve the money/ to buy】 off your sins.What if, ins】tead of ma】king environmental protect【ion a side \issue, busine】ss】es made the\se 】kinds of carbon-】absorbing p/rojects a part\ of the new no【rmal/?Restoring biodiv】e\rsi【tyTi/】lmann/ Silbe】r, director 】of/ sustainable supp【ly\ chains】 for enviro/nmental expert, South P/ol】e, di【scus】ses how imp/\ortant a completely new approach c/ould】 be in allowi【ng b/【rands to show they/ are seriou【s abou\t fighting climate c/h/ang\e.“In/setting is derived from o/ffsetting【, as the name suggests,&rdquo】; Silber ex【plains. Wh/ere】 offsetting【 works to outso\urce to part】n】er 】\/organis】ations, insetting finds【\ ways to add/ /carbon miti/gating enterprises into t】he process of producing the product. “They would/ be looking for【 pr【ojects i\n or 【】close to their 】/supply 】\chain.”Convent】ional car【bon neutralising usuall【y i\nvolves investing in】 projects u\nre/lat\ed\ to【 produc】ts, b\ut insetting instead addr/e】sses a company’s balance wi\th \the\ ecosystem directly. B\urberry】, for\ example, recently announ【ced th/at it wou【ld b/e /partnering with PUR Projet 【to improve carbon ca/】ptur【e on farms run by their wool \producers 】in Australia. Restorin】g the biod】iversi\ty of these 】habitat/s helps cap/ture CO2 from the atmosphe【re /but also ensures th\e future of the land】scape.Where off】setting is re【active, makin】g changes】 internally is i/nte\n【ded【 to anticipate potent】ial negative s【oc【ial and env\ironmen【tal im\pacts before /they even happen. Ultima/tely the goa【l is to provid】/e a net p】osi\tive outcome.Burbe【/rry is helping to restore biodiversity fo】r】【 sheep farmer/s】 i/n Australia.U/nsplash【Is our addiction to Spotify ruini/n】g the planet? The【 environme/ntal \cost of st】reaming is\ invisi/bleS】yntheti】c palm oil bei【ng b】rewed 】like beer gets Bill Gates' inv【estm】entScie/ntists have work\e\d out \how to generate 】elect/ri/city fro/\m th【【in 【/airMak/i【ng important investmentsInsetting c/an be expensive to set u\p, but t】here is a range o】f/ benefits beyond\ purely financial【 rew/ards. “It improves【 /the resilience【 of the \supply \chain by investing/ w】her\e it is most vulnerable,&r【dquo; Silber says.\ Farmers and w【or【kers 【in areas where compa\nies set up p【rojects like this end up w】\ith greater security in thei【r/ i\】ncom】e, less/【 environmental po/llution, and【 regeneration o【f the ecosystem tha\t they rely on to \live.Bu【t big bu/si/nesses \have to work t【ogether with th\e people that\ g】row their material【s, to make s【【ure that these changes actually w/ork. &l】d】q【uo;There ha/s to be 【a p【artnership ap/proach, it’s not sust【ainable】【 to force farmers to make changes\,” explains Silber./ &ldqu/o;It’s not e\no】ugh to just make \it financ\ially\ attractive in the shor\t-ter【m, that m/eans a farmer sig】ns up for 5 to 【10 \years and【 the】】n stops doing it.”Feedback fro\m co【mmun/ities i/s essential【 to ensur\i/ng that i/nsetting is su】ccessf】ul.\ Unsustai【nab【le practice/s ca\】n【 be ex\ploitative 】and d/amagin/g to loc【a【l e\cosystems,【 pre【venting/ farmers \fr/om being \abl】e to ensure a secure income long-term. Making sure t【hat people feel they are being liste】ned t【o encou【rages th/em to\ continue\ fa【rming and pass on skills to future\ ge/n\erations. A positive mo【ve for local/ farmers, workers and for t【h/【e co\mpanie】】s employing them.So】 how cent/ral is ins【etting to a net】-zero future?】 】Silbe/r 】thinks it is definite】ly b【ecoming m/or//e】 mainst【rea\m, /whi】ch i/s good for e\miss/i【ons goals, b【ut it’\s risky and may\ not be possible for every】body. “Not 】everybody can move at the s/ame pa\ce wh【ich m/eans 】offsettin【g is still important,” he says. Technical skills f【rom more con/ven【tional emissions projects】 are also essential a】nd mea/n \th//at busine\sses end】 up working with many of the same /partners th】ey were bef/o\【re.Carbon i\nse【tting is about more th】an just \tree planting.Lukas\ Rodr/iguez/ PexelsIs inset\ting \just ano】ther way to plant trees?】Planting trees is just one way of b\ringing carbon】 emission absorbi\ng practices【 i/nto th【e su】pply chain. The idea/ could expand to include be/tter recycling facilitie/s, i/nves/ting 【in\【 energy ef/】ficiency o】r even projects impr/oving commuting 【options for employ\ees, a 】】paper\ by 】Eco\metrica\ sug\ges【ts. The【】se kind/s 】o【f changes a【/re lik】ely 【to b\e【 a lot】 \easier and cheaper to achie/ve,】 mak\ing them appealing to businesses /looki/ng t】o communicate their green crede/ntials.Often a ris/ky and expensive investmen【t/, however,】 \it 【could be a【 long】/ time be】fore re\gener/a【tive environ】men/tal projects become mainstream. In the near 】future\, buying a/bsolution by asking a company to offset your emis/si【ons will pro【ba/bly remain the approach for most. Ecometrica re】ckons tha】t thanks\ to the fact t\hat the/y become a part of 】the way a product/ is made,\ carbon inse\】tt【i\ng pr【ojects ar/e likely t】o be a better bet for\ 】sustainability in the】 lo/ng-term.Share this article More from lifej1I7

1g5WHow/ is the【 UAE ta】ckling its food waste problem?【0AQC

SOjoText siz】eAaAaThese days, paying to \plan/t trees or inves】ting in g/reen projects as】 a way 】to balan\ce out your carbon emissions is a pretty stan\dard method o】f easing your en【vironm【ental conscienc】e. K/nown as car【bon offsettin\g, the process /has spawned a thriving business 】mak/i\ng billions of euros every year as com【panie【s /trade c】\a/】r【\bon credit\s to reach cli\mate c/hange g\oals.Yo/u can 】now even 】offset to und/o you\r own 】personal envi\r】onmenta\l damage, with a\irlines and organisat【ions offering /to he/lp you tak/e full resp【onsibi】l【ity】 for yo/ur 【residual emissions. For/ a small fee, o【/f \c/】\ourse. I【ncreasingly, however【, this s/ustain/ability】【 sol】u\t】io\n has come under】 fi【r】e from activists as being 】little\ more than/ gr【ee/n【washing. Criti【c/s have comp【ared【 \it to the practice of/ selli【ng indulgences\ /in the ancient Ca\tholic church; you can live\ h/ow】 you want as】 long as y【ou ha【ve the money/ to buy】 off your sins.What if, ins】tead of ma】king environmental protect【ion a side \issue, busine】ss】es made the\se 】kinds of carbon-】absorbing p/rojects a part\ of the new no【rmal/?Restoring biodiv】e\rsi【tyTi/】lmann/ Silbe】r, director 】of/ sustainable supp【ly\ chains】 for enviro/nmental expert, South P/ol】e, di【scus】ses how imp/\ortant a completely new approach c/ould】 be in allowi【ng b/【rands to show they/ are seriou【s abou\t fighting climate c/h/ang\e.“In/setting is derived from o/ffsetting【, as the name suggests,&rdquo】; Silber ex【plains. Wh/ere】 offsetting【 works to outso\urce to part】n】er 】\/organis】ations, insetting finds【\ ways to add/ /carbon miti/gating enterprises into t】he process of producing the product. “They would/ be looking for【 pr【ojects i\n or 【】close to their 】/supply 】\chain.”Convent】ional car【bon neutralising usuall【y i\nvolves investing in】 projects u\nre/lat\ed\ to【 produc】ts, b\ut insetting instead addr/e】sses a company’s balance wi\th \the\ ecosystem directly. B\urberry】, for\ example, recently announ【ced th/at it wou【ld b/e /partnering with PUR Projet 【to improve carbon ca/】ptur【e on farms run by their wool \producers 】in Australia. Restorin】g the biod】iversi\ty of these 】habitat/s helps cap/ture CO2 from the atmosphe【re /but also ensures th\e future of the land】scape.Where off】setting is re【active, makin】g changes】 internally is i/nte\n【ded【 to anticipate potent】ial negative s【oc【ial and env\ironmen【tal im\pacts before /they even happen. Ultima/tely the goa【l is to provid】/e a net p】osi\tive outcome.Burbe【/rry is helping to restore biodiversity fo】r】【 sheep farmer/s】 i/n Australia.U/nsplash【Is our addiction to Spotify ruini/n】g the planet? The【 environme/ntal \cost of st】reaming is\ invisi/bleS】yntheti】c palm oil bei【ng b】rewed 】like beer gets Bill Gates' inv【estm】entScie/ntists have work\e\d out \how to generate 】elect/ri/city fro/\m th【【in 【/airMak/i【ng important investmentsInsetting c/an be expensive to set u\p, but t】here is a range o】f/ benefits beyond\ purely financial【 rew/ards. “It improves【 /the resilience【 of the \supply \chain by investing/ w】her\e it is most vulnerable,&r【dquo; Silber says.\ Farmers and w【or【kers 【in areas where compa\nies set up p【rojects like this end up w】\ith greater security in thei【r/ i\】ncom】e, less/【 environmental po/llution, and【 regeneration o【f the ecosystem tha\t they rely on to \live.Bu【t big bu/si/nesses \have to work t【ogether with th\e people that\ g】row their material【s, to make s【【ure that these changes actually w/ork. &l】d】q【uo;There ha/s to be 【a p【artnership ap/proach, it’s not sust【ainable】【 to force farmers to make changes\,” explains Silber./ &ldqu/o;It’s not e\no】ugh to just make \it financ\ially\ attractive in the shor\t-ter【m, that m/eans a farmer sig】ns up for 5 to 【10 \years and【 the】】n stops doing it.”Feedback fro\m co【mmun/ities i/s essential【 to ensur\i/ng that i/nsetting is su】ccessf】ul.\ Unsustai【nab【le practice/s ca\】n【 be ex\ploitative 】and d/amagin/g to loc【a【l e\cosystems,【 pre【venting/ farmers \fr/om being \abl】e to ensure a secure income long-term. Making sure t【hat people feel they are being liste】ned t【o encou【rages th/em to\ continue\ fa【rming and pass on skills to future\ ge/n\erations. A positive mo【ve for local/ farmers, workers and for t【h/【e co\mpanie】】s employing them.So】 how cent/ral is ins【etting to a net】-zero future?】 】Silbe/r 】thinks it is definite】ly b【ecoming m/or//e】 mainst【rea\m, /whi】ch i/s good for e\miss/i【ons goals, b【ut it’\s risky and may\ not be possible for every】body. “Not 】everybody can move at the s/ame pa\ce wh【ich m/eans 】offsettin【g is still important,” he says. Technical skills f【rom more con/ven【tional emissions projects】 are also essential a】nd mea/n \th//at busine\sses end】 up working with many of the same /partners th】ey were bef/o\【re.Carbon i\nse【tting is about more th】an just \tree planting.Lukas\ Rodr/iguez/ PexelsIs inset\ting \just ano】ther way to plant trees?】Planting trees is just one way of b\ringing carbon】 emission absorbi\ng practices【 i/nto th【e su】pply chain. The idea/ could expand to include be/tter recycling facilitie/s, i/nves/ting 【in\【 energy ef/】ficiency o】r even projects impr/oving commuting 【options for employ\ees, a 】】paper\ by 】Eco\metrica\ sug\ges【ts. The【】se kind/s 】o【f changes a【/re lik】ely 【to b\e【 a lot】 \easier and cheaper to achie/ve,】 mak\ing them appealing to businesses /looki/ng t】o communicate their green crede/ntials.Often a ris/ky and expensive investmen【t/, however,】 \it 【could be a【 long】/ time be】fore re\gener/a【tive environ】men/tal projects become mainstream. In the near 】future\, buying a/bsolution by asking a company to offset your emis/si【ons will pro【ba/bly remain the approach for most. Ecometrica re】ckons tha】t thanks\ to the fact t\hat the/y become a part of 】the way a product/ is made,\ carbon inse\】tt【i\ng pr【ojects ar/e likely t】o be a better bet for\ 】sustainability in the】 lo/ng-term.Share this article More from lifeUMPv

Family-run fish/eries struggle /as \new generati\on casts net wider

VkHKWi\th/ the Europ\ean Union’s】 focus on the climate action and the EU\ G【reen D\eal, Commissioner \for Envir【on】ment, Oceans【 and F【is/h/e【ries \Virginijus Sinke/vič/;ius is la【unching a /new/ 【Global Coalition for Bi【odiversit【y\ at Wor【ld Wild Life Day in】\【 Monaco.The youngest Com】missio】ner at the Eu\ropean Union, Lith】uanian S【inkevi&【#2/69;ius was a member of \Lithuania【n【 Parliament and Minister of the /Ec【/onomy and In\】no【va/tion o【f the Republic of Lithuania be【fo】re t【aking the p】ost a】t t】he E【uro】pean Commission.【Now charged with finding European solu\tions to the worsening /c】limate and ecological crisis, he spoke to Euronews' busine】ss edito【r,\ Sas】ha Vakulina about what is re】qu\ired to turn climate change and bio【d】【】ivers【ity\ loss around.Tell us【【\ a b【it more a】bout th【e Global Coalition for /Biodiversity and 】what is its role\ wh【en/ it comes to the bigger E\U e/n/】vironment】】al agenda?\I think we hav】e a\chieved\ terrific succes\s 【in rec【【e【nt years launching/ similar campai/gns on marin\e litte\r, on plast\【ic pollution in our oceans. Now ha】vin】g【 \thi/s year/ 】being devote【d to biodiversity, it is time to\ raise awareness about /biodiversity loss. The science is very 】】clear:/ 【out of 8 million as/】sesse\d – /1 mi\llion are at risk of extinction. We ha\ve to halt biod/】iversity loss caused /by 【the human activ】ities. \The b】e【st tool to /do so is a societ/y which is mobilized, which supp【orts certai【n decisions, which leads us to me\et/ing ho【pefully in Oc/tober/ in China【 /to 【r】each a global 【agr//e/ement equal t】o t\he P】aris \Accord reached in 201】6.And latest Euro-bar】ometer 【shows us 94% o【f Europeans care about environment【 /\p【r/otectio】n\ – 【it is a clear signal for politicians to【 act. A】nd I am tru【l\y p/roud that the】 European Commissio\n did so from t\he very \first days, introducing our flagship initiative &ndash\】; the Eur】opean Gr/een Deal.With the bi/g social movement over the past year, i/ncluding Frida\ys fo】r Fu】\tur【e, there has been a big focus on/ the climate /and /ecological crisis. Should【 focu/s shift to/wards【 biodi\/vers【【ity?【To\ b\e honest we don\&rsq【uo;t need \to c】\h\ange t\he】 focus. Climate change is \important and significa】nt 【to be a/ware of. And I a【m 【truly happ【y th】at we\ finally reached the】 point that w//hen you ask people in t/he \st/reet, they w\ill explai】n climate change to you. I think we have to do the same great work raising awareness about \biod】iver/s\ity. Because\ if y】ou lo/ok at the solution for stopping climate change/ and/ glob/al warming, on/\e third/ of it i/s in having a healthy ecosystem of biodiv【/ersity【 &n】d\ash; healt/【hy 【oceans\, seas, la】nd】】【, forest - everythin/g around\ us is/ biodiversity】】. 】And, of course, th】ose 】specie\s whi【c【h not o【nly 【keep o【ur nature alive, but also put food on our】 table【】s.The Eu】ropean Union has clearly put 【the Green D】e】al on】\ top on its age\nda. What is the 'blue' element \of the bigger Green\ 】Deal Pict】ur/e?That is 】correct. P【art of my\ work is to make the Green deal blue. By【 protectin】g biodiversit【y we canno【t speak only about protecting sp\ecies or\ protectio/\n of l/and, soil or fores】t. We【 also have to address oceans. That is \why this year it is/ going t】o 【be c【rucially important /】\to als】o reach a global agreement on \/protection of the high seas】,\ which today, \is not being ful/ly implemented.EU budget talks o【r M\ult】ia\nnual /Fin/a//ncial Framework (MFF) \talks are on/ /amid pr】essu【re for more climate action. What are 】your expectations a/nd what 】are your priori\ties th\】a【t/ y\ou want to see fr】om the MFF?】F【irst o\f all, pro【bably, the Commissi【on would like to see agreement. We /can/no【t a//fford delay and that would be, pro】bably, /th\e worst outcome.S】econdly,】 】o】f course, if /we \are to seriou\sly step \u\p effort on biodive】rsity protectio】n, on t/he Green Deal, it has【 to be su】fficien】tly funded. I a】m glad to see that that call\ has 【been heard【, bu\t most imp】ortant】】 is th\e part on subsidies. S【ubsi【【die】s, payme/nts\, which \go directl【y from/ the EU budget, fro\m different en/velope/s – they 】also have to /be in\】 line 】with the 】Gree/n Deal and the/y can】not enhance】 biodiversity loss or stimulate climate change.W\e have \to be sure that/ certain activ/i\ties do/\n’t cause environmenta\l loss, because it \would be ve\/ry strange if on the\ one han/d we increase【 】funding for b】iodiversity pro/t】ection, but on the other hand we fund certa【in \a】ctivities /that cause biodiversity lo【ss【.Y【ou’/ve touc\hed upon challenges and the i/mporta】【nt thi】n【\gs t/o do this year, what a【bout th\e Brexit s】】itu\ation when i】t comes to fisheries/【?Ne】go【tiations \just started and w\e are ready to t】alk. And I think if we are going to】 have a d\ialog【 where we/ are ready to mee/t each other, we a【re\ going 】to h】ave\ /a result tha】t is satisfying to all. The most imp【or【tant rea/lly 】i【s to com/e】 with \willingne\ss to find an /agreement.The /Fisheries agreement is th【e only one th【at's time bo\und, /it is a 【very short time. Let/’/s begin.\【 We a\re ready,\ I know the B\ritish /side as well. We 】will work tirelessly to find the best agreement/.【As a\【 former Mi/nister for the Economy and\ 【Innovation \in Lithuania, how does t/his 】experien/ce influence your job now as EU Co/mmissioner for Environment, Oceans and /Fisheries?On】e of t\he\ key \initia/tives tha/t we a\re g】oi/ng 【to a】/nnounce on the 11 March is t\he 】Cir【cular\ 【Economy A】\c\ti\on pl\an. It has various elements fro】m product policy to business 】and small/】 and medium enter】prise/ (SME) in【volvement. Beca/use if we are successful 【in imple\menting a \c/ircular econ\omy and 】changing\ current economic activities, if we to manage decoup\le grow【th from extract】i/on of resources, we can be very s【ucces\sful at halting biodivers】it】y loss. Bec【ause biodiversity loss is mainly【 due to extractio\n of resources which put enor/mous pr\essure on o】ur envi【】r【onment.T】h/ere is this aspect of transitio/【n 】a【s well when it comes 【to these\ new】 polic/ie【s. 【What is your\ take/ on that\?It i\s v/】ery \im\portant and \from the very b【eginning the【 Commi/ssion was vocal t\hat n\obod/y can be left \behin/【d.】 It i\s imp【ort】ant to mention that G】r】ee】n 【Deal i【s a g】rowth st】rategy 【and 】growth m\eans not t【o hold the amb】ition, but also help those, who are still not the】re. \An】d I think】 】the Green Deal can only be successful by/ having eve/ryone on board.An\d the final question, /you are the youngest commis【【sioner. How/ does th】】at influence your \polici\es?I a【m【 very open to communicate with everyone, wi\】th 】every Europ\ean citiz【en】 w/ho cares. 【And I think my role is to \/【raise awar/eness and 】to d\eliver./Share this articleCopy/】p】aste the article video embed link below/:Copy】ShareTwe】etSharesendShareTweet\/SharesendM\/ore\】HideShar【eSendSh【areShareShareSendShareShar】eYou 【【might also like 】 \ "No single co\untry w】ill be left behind in t】his crisi【】s&q\uot; says【 EU Commissioner for Internal Market / 【 【 / / \【 】 Fiscal support to non-Eurozone countr】ies a p】ossibil\ity as 】bloc backs\ ma【ssive coronavir【us 】rescue plan 】 【 / \ \ \【 Cor/on【avirus: an unpr】ecede/nted c】hallenge to de\mocracy? / 【 More aboutEnvi】ronmental prot】ec】tionE【U Com\missionE\uropean 】politicsMon\aco 【 Browse today's tagsYkbo

QxzaText sizeAaAaT/he Osc\ar-winning actor and\ fi【lm produ】c/e/r is no longer just the Wol/f\ of 【Wall 【Street, or our beloved Jack from Ti/tanic, he&\【rsqu/o;s now a ful\ly-fle【【dged env\i】ronm\e】ntalist on a mission.L【eading 【the c\harge on World E\arth\ Day every year, Di【Ca/prio this year released a '/We Lo\ve 【The Earth'/ music vid【eo aiming to【 make people【 think twice about the/ w】ay 】they treat the planet. He 】a【l/so made a 【do【c】um/enta\ry【 in 2016 with Nationa/l Geographic, 'Before The Flood【', where he m【et s【cientist/s, activists and \world le【ade】rs to d【i\scuss the dange【rs of climate change.Read more | How Justin Bieber 】shut down an Ic/eland\ic /beauty sp】otBack in\ 2015, DiCaprio decided to take the plung\e and purc/】hase an island in Belize \to bui\l【d his very own eco-resort, s\et to 】be \&l】dquo;\g\rou/nd-breaking in/】 the environmental movement.&rdquo】; 【The island in /qu\estion, Blackado/re Cay【e, was sold fo\r ./75 m\il/li/on to DiCaprio and his bu\siness】 partn\【er, who h\ave/ been working ever since to\ create an eco-haven in Central America, which is //s\et /t\o open in 2020.\Where exactly is it and why has/n’t it opene\d yet?\【B】lackad\/ore Caye island is sit【uated off the coa\st of Belize\, with a diverse ecosy\s】tem/ of land and /marine【 species/【 that is recognise】d g/\lo/【bally as part【 of the ‘Mesoamerican B/iological Corrido\【r&rs/qu/o;\ region. Nea\rly 1.5 million tourist 【visit Belize each y/ear, to stay in【 beachfront cottages an\d luxur】y hotel【\s alike. But Le】/onardo DiCaprio’\s e\co-reso【rt could】 mark a】 【revolutionary change to tourism i/n t/he area, as visitors would【 come \f【o/【r a &l】dquo】\;rest【orative experie】nce” o\n th/eir s】ust\ainable stay.BelizeGetty ImagesAlexander \HafemannThe eco-resort was supposed 【to o\pen in 2018, but the team anno/【unced that the opening was to be delayed u/ntil【\ late 2019 as it was still incomplete. This /year, it is pr\esumed that th\e/ new opening is to be in 2020】, as the pro/ject has been o/n 】hold while envi\r【o】/nmental /【studies and permi】ts have been】 /issued b\y th】e governm【e】nt of Belize.What would the eco-resort b\e like?The isl】and【 \has suffere\d from overf【ish\in\g, an er\o【din/g coastline and deforestation \of its m\angrove tree/】s for/ years. DiCaprio’s resor\【t is hoping to be the eco-\f/riendl/y /answer to 】the/ 104-acre island’【s environmental problems throug\h building ‘off-t【he-grid liv\ing h】omes’ /and a research\ station focused on climate chang/【e. It plans/ to be the &\l】squo;World’s】 fi\rst/ truly/ restorative is【la\nd/ develo】pment’.Related | An eco-f【riendly twist on【 Alexa C】hung's Glaston【bury styleWhen it 【finally opens, the e/xclusive eco-resort will /jo【in Belize【's Four S】e\asons H【otel, wh/ich is also/ due/ to open in th\e near future as a green destinat\i】on.M\ock /up of Four \Seaso\ns Hotel, Be/lizeCourtesy】// of Four Sea\sonsDiCaprio's e】co-resort will feature a h【otel, 】36 resort bungalow】s and 36 e】stat】】e villas, with details 【s】uch as ‘circadian/ l【ighting’ and solar panels 】so t】hat 】each ho】me i】s energy e】ff【icient. Outdoor a\nd indoor ex\periences will be m【erged with open-air buildings/ /surrounded by 】palm t【rees, lush, green landscap\es an】d infi\n【//ity po/ols.\Footbridge ove】r river i\n【 tranq/uil fore/st in BelizeGetty ImagesTim He】sterWith un/rivalled sunset views, Blackadore Caye is 【being described a】s t/he Maldi\】ves of Central A【merica.W】hat d\oes Leonardo 【DiCapri】o have to say?Di\Caprio is an avid scu】ba diver. In fact, it was【/】 his/ f【irst trip /to Beli【z\e 【\to swim【 in】 its barrier reef i】n 2005【】 \that sparked the ac\tor&\r/squo;s love\ of th\e islan\d.In an interview【 wi】th The New Y】ork Ti【mes, Leonardo DiCapr/io said/ about the eco-resort:“The \m\ain focus is to do\ \something that wi\ll cha/nge the world. I couldn&rs【quo;t have gone】 to Belize and built on an \isl】and an【/d don】e something 】like t】his, i\f it weren’t for the【【 ide/a \that it \could be groun\/】【d】-break\ing i\n the environ\me【ntal movement.”Leonardo DiCaprioReuters&【ldquo;Wi\th】 th/【e onset o【\f clima【te chan/ge, ther【e are huge challenges, \so we want the structure to \not o\nly en\hanc/e and improve the environment, but to be a m/odel fo【【r the/ future./”Sha\re this\ arti】cle \ More from placesOi7p

ocmFTide turns f/or an Italian coas\tal wa/steland【/Dcr5

R1KMMore preparation time and p\eople obeying \con/finem/ent measures has helped Portugal manage its co【ronavirus o/ut/break, it's been claimed.Por】tugal h\as vastly di】fferent COVID-19 in【fecti\on and death rates/ com【pared /to【 n\eighbouring Spain, one of the \worst hit countries.【 Pulmonologist Dr【/ F/ilipe Froe】\s, an advisor to health chief Graça Frei】tas, said/ Portugal ha/d 】benef\i/ted 】f【rom being【 b/ehind Madrid in【 t/erms of the virus\'\ spread. Th\is, he adde】d, had given the/ country time to get hospitals ready【】 and \increase capacity in inte\nsi\】ve ca【re units."The differ【enc】e 【in Portugal was that we/ had more time to/ prepare," Dr Froes told Euronews' Good Morning Europ/e 【sho】w."We think we are three weeks behind】 Italy 】and pe】rhap【s one w\e/ek a/【【nd a half \behind Sp/ain, s】o thi【s gave【 us time,\ precious days, to prepare.\ I】 think\ the main differ】ence was\ also the early e/【n\gag\ement of primary ca\re physicians."Portugal】 declared 【a state of emergency o】n 18 March, just two da/ys after 【】the first COVID-19 deat【h wa\s reported.At the t/ime of【 】\writing, Portugal has confi】rmed 535 C】OVID-19 deaths, w\hich wo【rks out as 52 per one million】 o】f population.\ In Spain, m/ore than 18,000 have been /killed by the disease, giving it a r\ate of 385 fatalities for【 【each one milli【】on in\hab【itants.Madr\id's i\nfection rate is also double that of Lisbon's, al\though this measure can be skewed by ho【w muc\h 【test/ing a country c\arries out.Fr【eitas, Portug】a\l's \director general for health【, said /88 per c】ent\ of t/he country's confirmed ca\ses a/re s\taying at hom【e an/】d don'】t /re【/qu\i/re\ hospit【al treatmen/t. 【】"T】he \hospitals are not overwhelm/ed and we /have more t】ime【 and more [better] cond【itions to follow the c\ritical pat】\ients in the ICUs," she said."The data we have indicates that the maximum of our po/【tential ha【s not yet been r】eached,\ which reflects the evolution o\f /the epidemic.\"'【Unsurp/asse/d civic\ spirit'A study from t【h/e Nova Universit\y of 【Li/sbon indi】cates /the reproduction of C】OVID-19 in/ Port/ugal was 【 the low】es\】t in Europe during the first 25 day【s of the epidemic.Dr F/ro】es believes/ citizen ob\edien/ce has been cru\cial in 【prev】enting further spread 】of \the vir\us."【Most activities are closed,【 such\ as s【chools and commerci】al activiti】es, a/nd most people 【are 】usua\lly\ following the rules and we apply the \recommendations of th\e governmen【【t/," h【e 】said.Eduardo Cabrita,\ Portug\al's minister of in/ternal a】dmini/strati/\on, sai【【d Por【tuguese citizens 】showed "unsurpassed civic spirit" in com【plying with regulations\ over the 】Ea】ster weekend."S\ecur】it【y f/orce/s report very \lo】w levels of circulation of citizens \an\d widespr【e/ad a】dherence to recommend【at】i/ons."On Friday, Presi\dent Marcelo Re//】belo de】 Sousa pr/oposed /extending the national lockdown/ beyond 17 April, until 1 M/ay.Bu\t d【espite promising s【igns】, officials 【are/ warning it may st\ill be 【early to【 【e\val【uate Portugal's【 response to the coro/n【a】virus."The are/a of &\#8203;​housin】g 】in \residentia】l homes a【nd their workers】 is identified as o【f 】particular【 c【once/\rn 】and priority【 for a【ction【," said Cabrita.\Authorities fear the/ d\isease could sp】read rapidly through【 care homes as it【 has in ot/her/ parts of Euro\pe.B【ut Portug】al has take/n huge steps \to 】co【ntain the vi】rus, repatriating around 4/,000 citizens f\rom abro/ad.The Portug【uese go】v\ernment has also gran/ted citiz\en】ship】 rights/ to mi【grant\s and asylum seekers who have residency applications underway.The move was intended 】to ensur/e】 mor\e \people】 in the countr【y c/an access】 so】c】ial security and health care】.Share 】this/ articleCopy/paste 】/t/he article video embed\ link below:CopyShareT】w\【eetSharese【n/dShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShar/eSendShareShareShareSe/ndShare【Share【You might als/o lik】e 】 Coronavirus】 in Europe: Latest numbers o【n【/ COVID【-1【9 cases and deat\hs / 【【 / 】 】 / 】 】 \ \ Coron/avirus【 /in Eu\rope:【 Spain allows part】ial re】turn to wo】rk as casu【alty figures im/prove 【 \ \ 】/ 】Co【ronavirus【: Portuga\l/ 【grants temporary citize\nship /rights to migrants 【 【More aboutPortu/galCoronaviruslockd】ownEmer/genc【ySpainC【OVID-19Hot TopicLearn more\ about Coronavirus】 】 Hot\【 TopicLearn more about / 】 Coronaviru/s Browse toda/y\9【;s tagsn9hi

KPTIWhat【 might loo/k 】li/ke an ordi/nary offshore w】indmill to th/e u/ntrained eye,/ i\s actually】 somet/hing quite diffe/rent.T\his turbi/ne has been designed with 】a special telescopic technology that r】eportedly allows for a faster\【\, more efficient/ and\ cheaper\ instal\l【atio\n with【】in the ma【rine\ environment, according to its developers, Sp】anis\h 【】\engineering company】, EST/EYCO.Se\lf-Instal/ling】 Turb/i】ne Protot】ype Takes Final 【ShapeJust half-a\n-hour by /boat fro【m the is/】land's main p\ort, this offshore prototy【pe t/】oo/k almos/t 4 years/ to【 become a real\ity.And this dream was rea/l【ised through the ELICA【N projec【t - a three-y】ear undertak【ing, co/-finan\ced by the】 European Commission un【der the\ir Hor【izon 20【20 progra】/m for Research & Deve】lopment, which aims \to innovate and design greene/r types o\f ene】rgy.W【/ith /the EU'/s t\arget to go c】arbon-neutral by 2050, these types 】of /projects are ex/actly w/hat w/i【ll be n】eeded if that /targ/et \is to be /】m/et and a 【】Gree【n Revo\lut【ion in E】urope is/ to be/ ac\hieved【.But what makes\ these wind turbine/s /so unique?Well/, according to one of its eng】in【eers, it is\ the way/ it was bu/ilt and install【ed."/This prototype has two big systems. One is【 the /botto\m /foundation pla\tform/ \that allows the b【al/last of th/e system dow【n in the seabed. The other one is\ its/ auto-lifti/ng system. This allows the tower to/ be telescoped and the turbin/e raised into it\s final po\sition." 】 / / 【 【 /【 \ Ju【an Man//u/el Sanche/z Herrero \ / \ Mining Engineer, \ESTEYC\O 】 】 】 【 A/ccording to the devel\opers\,\ the /installation costs h\ave been reduced \by 35 per cent compared to 】those need/ed by/ ordinary of】fshore windmills, for which foundat】ions,\ t】ower, tur】bine and b【lade】/s have to be ass\em\bled at\ the fina【l\ l\ocation.Desig【ners say the whole system was conceived to be easily scaled up to the bigger, f】ar mo】re】 po】werful \【turb【ines 【- up to 12 mega【watt【s - which are abo/ut t【o ent】er the mar/ket./Whatev【er the \size /of the turbine, researchers sa】y that】 the stability of thes/e offshor【e platfo/rms is the main challe\nge,【 with /one engi【neer d】escribing wind turbines\ as "a nightmare in【 terms of stability."Top offshore wind pow\er pro\ducers in EuropeAl\on】】】g wi/th further i【mprovin【g some \of th】e technical【 /confi/gurations, researchers are now looking at the【 /marke】t opportunities ahead.According to Javier\ Niet】o, the Offshore Division Manager at ESTEYCO, th】e 】aim i/s to b/uild bi/gg【er and/ more comme】rciall【y viable win/d turb】ine farms, which will conta/in fro【m 50 to 70 constructions e/ac【h.This tar\get is stil【l a long way off, h】e says, but the hope is that Europe can lead the way as inn/ovator 【on/ environmental policies and 【i/nspire other【 nations 【\and contine【nts to【 start going green, soone【/r, rather than later.Howe/ver, if these objectives can be ach【ieve】d, then Euro【pe wil\l \be 【one\ step closer to kickstarting the Green Revolu/tion that it s】o\ desires.12 】 / 【 / \ 】Futuris【 - El【ican】/ 】 / 】 \ 】 】 \ 【 Euronews \ 】 12 】】 】 \ \ 【 Fu【turi\s - E】lican 】 \ 【 】 】 / 【\ 】【 \ 【 】 】 【Eu】ronews 】 \ / 12 】 【 【 【】 】 \ 】 Futuris - El/ican \ 【 \ / / 】 【 】 】/ 】 】Eurone\w【s / \ 】】 【 12 / / 】 \ Futuris【 \- Elican \ \ 【 】 \ \ 】 \ 】\ 【 / / 】Euronews 】 \/ 12 】 / 】 \ / Fut】uris - Elican/\ 【 / 】 【 Eu\ro//n\ews \ / 】 / 】 】Share this articleCopy/paste the article vide【o embed l/ink below:】CopyS/hare\TweetSharesendShar\eTweetSharesendMor/eHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou// m【ight also/ like 【 \ 【 H】ow c/an cemen】t factories be carbon-neutral by 2【050? \ \ / More /aboutRenewabl】e e】nerg\iesEnvir【onme\ntal /protectionEcolog\y 】 / Most vie/wed 】 Wh【at/ influenc\e on climate is the coronavirus lockdo\wn rea【ll【y having?/ 】 【 】 \ The new AI sys\tem safegua】r】ding pr\emature babies from】 i/nfection 【 \ 】 】 / Messeng/er RNA: the /molecule th/at may】 teach our b【odies to beat cancer 【 】 】 【 】 】 Apple and Goo\gle say they�【3;l【l w/ork \to/gether t】o t\race/ sprea/d of coronavirus via smartphones 】 H/\o\w/ EU fund\ing is【 ch/anging the face of L/atvian innovation 【 \ Browse to\day's tagsaUXQ

sxQgThe cement industry is r\esponsible for between 6 to 8 per \cent of global carbon【【 di【oxid\e emissions.Re\searchers looking 】into how to impro【ve the situation h【ave designe】d 】and built【【\】 an experime】】nt//al plant at a cement fact【ory in Belgi\um to try to \find soluti【ons.The factory, whi【ch covers around 70 hectare【s and employs 】around 1 workers, produces an estimated 1.4 million tonnes of 1/】 /di【fferent varieties of cemen/t from a common r】aw material: /limestone.But【 this 】comes wit/h an en】vironmental cost:/"I/f 【we produce one tonne of cement, we generate 0.6\ tonnes of carbon dioxide/. \This carbon 【dioxide main【ly c\omes from】 our raw m】ater【ial】s," s/ays Ja\n 】Theulen, direct/】or of】 al】ternative resource】s at \Heidelberg 】cement.Therefo/re, we need\ to de/velop】 te\chnologies to capture this c\arbon dioxide so that it is not e【mitted to the env/\ir【onment."The factory \has teamed up 【】with rese【archers from the Europea/【n research project, Leilac (\Low Emissions Intensity Lim】e And Cement)】 to search【 for such 】technolog/\ie\s.The outcome is a 6【0-meter/ high plant wit】h a pi【lot reactor th】at&\acute;'s alre\ady able to a/bsor【\【b 5 per c】ent of t】he f\actory&\acu】】te【;s total carbon dioxide emissi】ons\."【Ther\e is a big metal tube/ that´s heat\ed on t/he\ outside 【at /around【 a 1,000 deg】rees.\ The raw material is dropped in the top an\d it falls slowly d/own/. As this mate】rial】 gets heated,】/ it r/ele/ases its carbon d/ioxide. A\n【d th】is pure carbon dioxide c【an sim/ply be captured a【t the to/p," e】xpla\】in】s Leilac project coordin】ator, Daniel Rennie.Researche/rs say the tech】nology \requires 【minimal /chan【ges i【n the factory】&acut\e;s \con/ventional chain of 】cement production, \enabling the capture 】of ca\rbon dioxid【e with/o\ut additional chemicals.Bu/t there are stil】/l differ/ent【 challenges】 th\at need to be addressed."The materi】al /has to be【 able to flow 】do\wn the re】actor. It f】lows down the\ rea/ctor/, b】ut】/ then at the bottom, it n\eeds/ to be co/nveyed \i/n】to the o【th】er units /on sit\e," sa】y/s T/homas Hills, a process engineer, at Calix."T/he 】other/\ impo/rtant technical/ par/amet】ers are ensur\i【ng tha【t we get enough heat into】 the reacto【r and that we put this h【eat in t【h/e right places."The a/i】\m is to be ab】le 】to absorb as mu\ch carb】on 【diox\ide as possible in the safest, m/ost【/ en【erg】y-efficient way.Researc\hers n】eed to constantly assess the safety and efficiency of the whole/【 proce/ss \bo\th】 【\i【\n a co/ntroll/ed laboratory environment and in the\ reactor its\elf\."We take the powder 【befor】e it /go/\es in and measure t/he amount o【f c\arbon dioxide t【hat goes in】 it,"】 】says Hills."Then we measure after pass\ing throu/gh the 【reactor, and we measure【 【that amount of \c/arbon dioxi【de in the powder. And the di/】【ffer】ence is t//he amount \that we cap【tur【e."Researchers\ are now working 】to scale up the tec【hnology 】to captu\re 95 p】er】 cent of the fact/ory´s global carbon dioxide emissio】ns with a view to dev】elopi\ng other circular【 economy 】business models."Be/caus/e we 】are expecting very pure carbon dioxi\de to 】【be cap【tu/red, with】 some purification steps it can /【be/ used for the foo\d industry, it// can \be used for /growing/ plants, it【 can be used for helping /make n】ew fuels, /it can even 【be used in/ m【aterials to help build new prod【ucts【, " says Daniel】 Rennie.\Researchers be【liev\e the t\echn/olog/y can contr\i【bute to reaching the target of 80% re\duction in 【car\bon dioxide emissions i/n Eu】rope by 2050.Journalist name • Ka\ty Dar【t/for/dShare this 】articleCopy/paste the articl】e video embed link below】:Co【pyShareTweetShar【/esendSh【areTwe】etSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【】are】ShareSh\a】r\eSendShareShar【eY】o】u might also like \ 【 / 】 \ How to increase bio/div/ersity acros】s cities / \ \ \ 】 \ 】 N【e【【w windturbines for green e【ne【rg【/y, che】ape【r a】nd \quicker to build 】 More a】boutIndustry】New technologiesE\n/vir【onmental protec/tion 】 \ Most viewe/d / W\/hat i\nfluence on \climate is the coronavirus lockdown really ha\ving【【?【 【 【 \ Th【\e ne【w AI system safeguarding prema【ture bab/ies from infect【ion / 】 】 /】 【 Messenger RNA: \the molecul【e \that /may teach 】o】ur bodies to beat \cancer / 【 / \ 【Apple an】d Google say t】hey'll work together to trace s【pre【ad /of coron\avi/rus via smartphones 【\ 】 【】 How EU funding is changing the f/ace of Latvia【n innovat/ion 【【 \ Browse today/'s 】ta/gs5ywK

19ze“The lo\nge/r the sup】ply 】chain, the m/ore 【is【 wasted/”BHA3

jupw】One of Europe&r\squ【o;s biggest music festivals ha/s take\n its eco-c/reden/tials to the ne】xt l\】evel this summer, with r\eusable pape】r t\e/nts, reu\sable /c\u【ps a\nd e】ven water-saving toilet\s.Sziget festival /on Haj\】ógy&a/a\cute;ri】 Is【land, B【udape\/st, Hungary, kicked off on Wednesday, with【 a raft 】o\f en/vir/onmen\tally-friend\ly impr/ovements, and a focus on the climate.\As we\ll as all the music and partying, the UN Messenger of Peac\e Dr 】Jane Goodall w【il【l be just 】one of the\ speakers promot/ing the imp【ortance o/f pr\otecting the \env\i\ronment at/\ the ne\a】rly week-long fes/tival.&l【dqu\o/;Last】 year we could replace one and a/ half million single-use glasse【s wit/【h a few hundred /】th\ousand of re【u【sable glasses,” said Ákos Dominus, 】project manager of the Green Is【land【 project.“This yea\r\, the Sziget festi/val will 】consume million plastic glasses less, and the number is rising/ ev】ery【 year. So we can see how】 sustain】able this \program is.&r】dquo;On 】Sziget’s l【ast day/, tents, sleepi】ng bags, and mats\ that have been left】 behind will 】be co【llected by cha【rity organizati\ons.Share this a【/rticleC/opy/paste the article vid/【eo embed lin/k be【low:Cop/yShareTweetShar/esendSha【reTweetS】haresendMore/HideShareSen】dShareSha\/reShareSendS\hareShareYou【【 might al】so l】ike 】 S【\zi\get fest】iv/al atte】ndee/s defend Coca C】o/la's #LoveIsLove campaign in Hu/ngary / 【 【 / Hunga】rian/s say 【goodb/ye /】to winter with bizarre and scary c\ostume festiv】a【l 【 【 \ Ras Al/ Khaimah \Fine Arts Festi\val spo】tlights Emira\t\i &/; int/ernational \talent 】 / More】 ab\outSziget【 festi】val】FestivalEnvi/ronmental prot/ection / B【ro】wse today�/39;】s tagsUx5E

nyxoText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placestveB

IVInThe climat【e em】erg】e/ncy is 】no】t th/e【 only\ en【viron\】me【ntal issu\e th\e world【 i】s strug\/\gli】ng to solve. Plastic \products clog our ocean/s, /thre】atening /marine /life and poll【uting the water. At current rates plastic】 is predicted to outweigh all the f\ish in t/h】e sea by the \year 2050. In Holla/nd, a new device 【is a sm\all si】gn of 】hope.】 \'WasteSha/【rk' is a remotely /contro\lled device that 】co【llects rubbish 】from the water.Th】is m/ini-catamaran has been developed to remo【ve plastics and ot/h【er fl】oating debris from\ 【the sur\face of l【akes a【nd oceans/. Its sensors c【an moni/【tor pol】luti【on】 le\【v【el/】s a【n】d】 other environmental ind/icators. It 】is e/lectrically powered, emissio/n-free a】nd can collect hundreds of \kilos o\f rubbish at a /time. Ric/hard Hardiman is the \founder of Ranmarine Technologies, the comp\any responsible fo【r Waste Shark:"What【 we're tryi】/ng to do is cre/\ate a small enough vesse】l that will g【et into tight spac\es where wa/ste c】ol】lects, particularly in the harbours and the port【s,\ and s【top all that waste being take/n out in】to the grea/】ter ocean."I have】 a visio】n in 【my head that /keeps me 】going, that is】 you'd be sit\ting in a/ control room from our\ site 】we could se\e where /eve【ry drone is across/ the p】lane【t, how many\ \are o【perating, how much wast/e is being ca】ught and actually see the real im【pac\t of that these things are\ making a\round the world."\T/his is one of the 】proje\cts that receive/d su】pport from th】】e European funds allocated to】 making plas【t】ic circular. R【anmari/ne 【/is a\ Dutch startup \company and has already g\ot 【cust/o】m/ers】 in several countries. Tessa Despinic is its design en\gineer:"The basi\c function of /t/he】 WasteShark is very simple.【 【It just swims aroun】d and collects tra/sh f/rom the su/rface. 【But inside, it's always chan】ging, we're always try/ing to make 【it light【er, more efficie】nt/, easier to do mainten/a\nce on. And we【're also buil】ding \an autonomous v/ersion that w/ill s】wim a】round accord【ing\ to/ w【】aypoints /that y\ou give】【 it. So we're alw【ays wo/rking o\n that 【and /making】 it better/."Th/e Eu/ropean Union is l】eading the global fight against marine lit】ter. Besides its/ policies curbing single\-us\e plas/】tic【s and r\ed\ucing waste from l/ost\ fishing gear/, the EU ha】s earmarked 】350/ million Euro \【for research a\n/d de】velopment in this area.Watch Good /M/orni【n】g E\urope's report i\n the player\ ab/ove.J\ournalist/ \na\me • Joao Vitor【 Da Silva MarquesVideo editor • Joa】o Vitor Da Silva Marques】/Sha】re this \art\icleCopy/pas\te t/he a\rt/icle\ vi】deo embed link below:CopyShareTwe\etSharesendS/hareTw】ee】tSha\resen】dMoreHide/S【har/eSendShareShar\eShareSen【dS/hareSh【areYou might also like \ 】 C【OP25: C\hile summit/ withdrawa\l /hits tourism \b】/【u【t \opens new door fo\r environment\ a\ctivists / 】 /\ \ 【 / Is Blac/k Friday bad for/ the environment? Activists take on\ 【sh/opping【 fr【enzy 】 】 / C【ol】dplay to /pause touring, cit【ing environmental reasons / More aboutclima【te】 chang\ecli【】】】mate protectio/nClimate emergen【cyClim/a\te crisisEnvironm\ent polluti/onEn/vironmental】【】 protectionHot TopicLearn more about 】 climate chang】e Hot 【TopicLearn more about climat【e change \ Browse today's tagsufXL

ExPq\Founda/tion promot【es sustainable food 【product/i】【onfzJo

KZAE\Te】xt sizeAaAa/A s\how【case of t】ho/usands of completel\y sustainable f\abrics is co】ming to London, or】ganiser The Sustainable【 Angle has announced.【The not-for-profit o/r/g/anisation has been a rele】ntl】\ess/ 【s【upporter of innovative/ lower\ carbon solutions to fashio/n&rsquo【;s biggest problems【 since 2010 and hopes that this/ \ev/ent 】will encourag/e ev/en/ more /designe】】rs and creators【 to adopt 】respo/n【sible solutions.】This will \be the ninth e/dit】ion of the Fut】ure Fabrics Expo which is the l\argest sho【wcase of sustainable fabrics of its k】ind. /With each f\abr【ic, informa/tion about where it has com/e from and 】/the/ environm\e/nta【l footpri/nt\ of【 its】 manufacture w\il/l be/【 provided. I【ncreas【ing tr\an/sparency in【 how our clothing i/s made is on】e\ way to he/lp bot【h designers and co【nsumers to 【make responsi\ble choice【s.Materials /o\n show will】 include 】the i/ncreas\i【ngly popular TENCEL Lyoce\ll and Modal as well as【 several fa/brics th】at take an innovative approach to post-cons【】umer recycling. Wi\th fashion waste /firm【ly in】 【the spotl【igh【t this season, there is a real dri【ve from /\consum】ers towa/rd more circular soluti【ons\】.These m\ode【rn approa\】ches will be e/xhibited alongside co/mpanies that ch】ampion t/rad\it\ional sustainable ma】te/rials/ like line/n and bast. Although less common i/n modern designs, these ancient f【】ab/rics are biodeg】radable and water-efficient. 【The plant fi【b【res fr】om 【】【whi】ch\ they are grown can ev\/en sequester C【O/ from the atmosphere.Founders of the expo, 】The【 Su】stainable Angle, hope t】o change the fash/ion i】ndustry \for the bet/ter s【o that, instea/d of stri】ppin/g resources an/】d p/oll\uting environments, \it can【 have a 】po/sit/i/ve impa【ct on n\ature an\/d the communities that 】\make o】ur cloth/es.Read/ More | W\【hat is Tencel? \T//h【e s\ustainable fabric e/v【eryone is 】talking /aboutClaire\ Bergk/am\p, Global Director of S【us【ta】inability and Innovation, Stella McCartney (left) in/ 【convers\ation/ with Orsol/a de Castro, Co-foun】der of Fashion Revolution】 (right)【\.Suzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustaina】\ble AngleAs well as showing off materials th\at designers can u】se t】o /decrease the e】nviro】nmental impact of t\heir own 【de】signs, the F/uture】 F【abrics\ Expo will also h【o\st panels to h\elp】/ ed/ucate atte\n】de/es and fac\ilitate discussion between industry exp【e【rts. Panels for\ the ninth Future F【abrics Expo will b/e】 focus\ed around r【egenera】t\i】ve, circul/ar ap】proaches to sust\ainable des【ign and how fashion can be a “powerful force /for positive change”.Future\【/ Fashion ExpoS\uzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustainable AngleAt 】a /p】an/el at last 【year’s event, Claire Bergkamp, Glob/al Director of Susta】】】inability and \Innovatio】n at Stella\ McCart/ney emphasised t\he value【 of eve\nts like t\his i】n helping to eradicate unsustainable mat】er\ial\s from t【he【 fashion in【du\/stry; “We have to \repl/ace them with i/nnova】t\ive, sustainable alternatives. The o/】ther half of inno】vati】on in the【】 future of fabrics has to be about rethinkin】g t【he syst】em【s 【tha】t we /have now…/【How can we find lower-im【pact ways o\f【】 】creating things?”.Part of the /Expo last year al】】so in【cluded two curated areas dedic\ated to fashion bra\nds fully embraci\ng responsib/le s】our\cing and circularity in thei【/r 【collections. New collaborati/on/s【 between leading designers and companies c/reating inno】vative new material\ technologies are the ideal outcome from this event.Suzanne Plunkett /The 】Sustainable A】ngle【The \【event will take place from the 29th-3】0th Januar/y 2020 at\ Victoria House, Bloomsbur\y Square, 】L】ondon. Tick/et registratio/n f/or de【【signers/ and brands /can be/ found h\er【e.Share this article \ 】More /from l\ifexgtA

4HONA】ngela Me【rk\el wants\】 Germany to aim to \n\eutrali/se gas e【missions by 2050cTzK

PhXjMalays\ian supermark\et fights back to ‘pro【tect the reputation’ of palm oilmVUR

1.tKhy“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Text sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000I/nside Bu\dapest's \green new campus twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ife 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagskQCU

2.Qn9nSoybean\ s【kiwear is th/e new plan】t-ba/【\sed tre【nd of 2020tTOO

3.ACCCText sizeAa】AaThere/’s a r/ea\son 】car bodywork is often referred to as ‘coachw【o\r/】k’. It】&rsquo】\;s【 beca】u/se the e\arliest cars /were】 litt【le more th/a\n motor/ised】【 version of h\orse【-drawn\ coach【es with passenger compartments usually made from wooden skeletons clothed in more wood, le【ather or fabric.\ \As car】 design moved】 on, s【o did】 the construction /of /their bo【dies to ste/el and aluminium. Now we are seeing a diversificati/on of /materials used to 】skin 】cars to\ maximise their s\/af//et】y and to ensure they /are lightweigh/t as well as】 s/ustainabl/e.Th\【is heralds a period of developme【nt and innova/tion tha【t hasn&\】rsquo;t been seen since the i/nt】roduction of carbo\n fibr/\e to Formu【la/ 1 racing /ca\rs in 1981.】 Bef【ore that, glassfibre was the \oth/er mo【s\t no】teworthy step fo【\r【ward in mat】eria\ls 【when it became a\ pop【ular choice】 fo\r creati【ng/ /【】comple】x shapes in the 】early 1950s for numerous home-bu\il\d specials.Related | Flying/ cars:\ ho】w close are we?Li/gh【twei】【ght \carbon fibreTo】day, the d】\eve】lopment of】 n\ew m【ate\rials is being undert【ak】en in a more structured and scienti\fic man\ner./ This 【i【s cle\ar f【rom 】the approach be【ing tak/en 【to creati/ng \car【【bon fibr】e that’s cheaper and eas【ier to】 produce. Lightweig【ht carbo】n】【 fibre is/ idea【l for man【y】 exterio/r car bod\y par【ts as it can/ be mou\lded into【 multi-contoured shapes easil【y w/hile】 remaining very strong to resist the k【nocks and bump【】s that car【s\ have to endure in normal life.Reducing the cost of maki\ng carb【on fibre also addresses one \of the drawbacks【 of this】 material in the past: 【th】e cost of repairing or repl】acing【 it. For example, fixing\ Ro/w】an Atk\inson】’s McL\aren F1 with \all of its carbon fibre part【s 】is thou/g【ht【 to h】av\e been the largest ever vehicle】 insurance pay-out in UK his\】tory at &po/und;910,000.Wonder/ material from【 recycled c】lo\thi【ng 【Voir\ cett【e public】ation】 sur Instagram】U/ne publication partagée par Faraday Fut\ure \(@fa】radayfutu\re) le 27 /\Juin 2018 &/ag【【rav\/e; 11 :27 PDTToday, we find carbon\ 【fibre in u\se a】cross many\ mainstream cars,/ tho\ugh/ it tends to【 b\e us/ed in str\ategic areas whe\re\ stren】gth and lightweight materi/als【 ar【e cr【uci【al. Using【【 carbon fibre /more widely】 /lowers m/anufacturing costs, which 【is why comp【anies li/ke Fara【da\y F\uture based 【in California, USA are【 wo\r/k】ing on ma/\king th】is wonder m\ater】ial from recycled clothing. By bre\aking th】e materials down\ to t【heir】 /molecular\ 】leve/l】, it&r】squo;s possible to re-\engin/e】er them in】to carbon f】ibr/e.Related |If you c/ou/ld】 fly cl\eanly, would you?R】odrigo Caula/, a \material designer at Faraday, e/xplai【n/s: "【It sou】nds like science fiction\, but it’s happ/】ening now. We can extrude \entirely new bi】o-based fibr/es with special equipment and re-engineer the molecu\lar properti\es of \the sour【ce material \dur/i【ng this proce\ss. /You\ co【uld technic\ally design a fibre to be h\ydrophobic, fire【 retardant or /biodegradable\ – it’s almost alch】】【emy.】"Howeve\r, in/dustry】 anal//ysts 】reckon the average car wil】l only have a 15% carb【/o【n fibr\e content by 2040. The majorit/y \o\f the \】\remaining material w/【ill remain steel, but much of this w】ill be mor】e speciali/sed versions of\ st/eel such as //Ult/ra High】 Strength Steel and boron steel fo【r】 key co/mponents. That’s good for the rig】idity /of/ 【the car and its /c/rash-worth】ines/s, but the more specialised the ste\el, the /more difficult /it becomes 【to recycle.】So, for bodywork, composite materials lik\e carbon fibre rem\ain 【the key to th\e future. While carb【on fibre is \becoming \mo】\r\/e a/fforda【ble and easier to make, there are other co\mposites being develo】ped. Plastic is one of the 【key】s to this【, even if it\ hasn’t had th/e be】st reput/ation d】ue to 】its【 environme】】ntal impact.Rela】ted |Zooming in o/n the future of electric mo【torcyc/lesInte【/rior panels mad】e with p/las\tic w【aste found in the /oceansFaurecia car interiorFaurecia carsFor vehicle use,【 plas\tics are now being develop【ed from the same material that has been t【aken from /wa】ste sources, e\it【her from\ recycled packaging or even extracted from the se】a. BMW has been l/eadi\ng th】e wa【y in this field and its i3 already /has 【interior panels made【 from/ \c/apt【ured plastic waste from the oceans.Exterior body pane//ls a】re also】 being m【ad/e fro/m/ 】/plastic that i/nclu【des 20% hemp fibre. Automotive supplier Faurec/ia 【ha/s been de/】【velopi】ng this f【or so【me time and has/ created a process that allows the plastic t【o be in\jectio】n \moulded so it can form difficult curves while al】so being lighter【 than m\o/st o\ther formed pla/stic panels【.As well as\【 this sort of innovation, more traditional materials are als】o making a co\/meback f】or car bod\ywo\rk.\ A pr】【ime e/xa\mple of this is wood, 】\but not/\/ th】e sort of plank【s a/n\d varnished t】imbers 【of】 old. Instead, wood pulp【 \is bei\ng developed by Toyota becau\se /the finis】h/ed produ/ct/ 【is f\iv/e times stronger than steel yet 80% lighter. This【 has big ramificatio/ns\ as th【e wo】rld moves more toward【s】 electric vehicles with t【heir h\eavy ba【ttery pa\cks w/here wood pulp can help /\offset this \bulk.Aluminium 】is\ another trad【i/tional \mat/erial /that is far from the end of its development fo【r vehicle bo/dy【 panels. Traditionally used f/or lightweight \sports cars, aluminium is now more widely\ used as\ it off【e\r【s】 the same strength as【 s】t】eel for 】much/ /less weight【. That&rs】qu【o;s 【【ideal f\or exterior pa【nels and a【】lum/【inium is al】so easier to/ \work with when 】prod】/ucing panels i\n \bulk quan】titi【es.Re/lated | Meet the leather maker w\ith th\e lowest carbon footprint in the worldL【ooking around all/ of the /major motor shows in recent times, it&rsquo\;s obvi】ous tha【】t car \】make】r【s 【are diversifying their b/ody panel materi【als. For some, environmental im【pact is t\he prime fa【ctor】, but for/ others it】 offe\【rs the chance to pick fr/om a greater choice of materi/als to suit very specific pa【rts【 of a car&\rsquo;s exterior, which almost completes the circle back to the origi】ns of coachbuilding.Words: Al】isda【ir \Su【ttieShare this ar\ticle 】 \ More from life6bww

4.ju6wAn international ag\reeme\nt signed in 2018 pre【ventively banned all【】 commercial fishing】 in \the【【 】Central Arct【ic Ocean —【 long befor【e any 】fishi【ng could /\real】istically begin. Why was that ban necessary, and how can marine biologists 【ta/ke advantage of】 planned po【lar/ expedition\s to/ f/ind out more about future fishing prospects in the Arct【/ic \high seas?Dr. Pauline Snoeijs 【Leijonmalm, Professor of Marine Ecol【o】gy a【t S】tockholm University, talked to E/uronews hours before lea【ving Troms&os】lash【;, Norway onbo\ard the Po\larstern\ icebreaker f【or the MOSAiC \expedition at the Nort\h Pole.She bega/n by explaining【 \w/hy we n】eed a fishing ba\n in the region:“We don/’t kn【ow a】nything abou【】/t 【the ecosystem,【 and\ we don’t kno【w anyt】h【ing about which fish we\ have! It’s a very /nutr【i/e】nt-poor ecosystem,\ so I expect ver/y little fish. And then if you st【art fishing, th【en you can destroy the ecosy/stem, or th/e balance of the organisms."MOSAiC Exped/ition'/s research camera【Once th】e/ ic】e disappe】ars, there \could be a ru\sh to fish\ t\he are【a\, which lies outside the exclusive eco】nomic zon\e of th【e\ coastal countries“\So that’s 】why we ne【】ed to kno\w】 now what /we have in this sea that perhaps can be/ exp/loited by anyone," P】rofessor Leijonmalm explains.【 "And 】】of course, we need prot【ectio】n for this are【】a. So what we’re going to do i【【】s to build\ a way to protect thi\s ar【ea 【by c/】ol/lect【ing b【ase】line【 data.&l/d【q/uo;We】 are at the very/ beginning of this/.\ What we are doi\ng is now mappi/ng, and this is t\he first expedi\t】ion tha】t&rs\quo;s going to map. And \the big advantage of conn【ecting\ to such【 a big exp/edition is t】hat we get all the environmental data【】 from the ship’s 】program &】mdash;】 s/o we【 do no】t need to】 /\measure the】 chlorophyll /our【se】lves, or the 】【nutrients, or not【 even th\e zooplan【】】kt】on. We \need o】nly to look【 a】t the fish】, and the other data【 we can use, and connect then】 the fi】sh data t\o. /So that’s/ a very big adv【\a【n\tage of these【【 big expeditions./&rdqu【o;/Pol】arstern ic/ebreaker sets sail】 for the North PoleShare thi\】s art/】\icl/eCopy/pas【te th【e /article video embed \link \below:Cop\yShareTweetShar【esen【dShare\T\w【eetShare【sendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShare/Sha】reSendSha\reShareMore aboutGlobal warming and climate changeFisheryArcticEnviro【nmenta/l protectionGreenland / Mo】s】t v\iewed 【 Wh【at i\nfluence on climate】\ is the cor/o/navirus lockdown really having? \ 【 】 】 】 \ 】 / The new AI system s\【【af【eg【uarding prematu】re【 /babies from infectio】n 】 \ 【 Messe\nger RN】A: the molecule that ma/y teach our bodies to \beat cancer 【 /\ 】 \ App/le\ and G】o\【ogle 】say they'll wo/rk \togethe【r to 】trace sprea\d of cor【onavirus via smartphon】es 【 】 \ \ How EU funding /is ch/ang】ing the face 【o/f Latvia\n innovation 】 】 】 【 \ Bro\wse today/'s【 ta\gsq0n9

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NQohText sizeAaAaA\s on【e/ of the o【r\ganisations aiming to】 tackle marine plast/ic pollution, the \S】eychelles Is/l【a【nd Foundation【 has just\ 】released a video 】(click on \the player/ abo】ve) proving that e/ven 【the most remote corners 【o\f the ocean are suffering from the horrors of plastic waste and【 endang/e【red a【nimals. UNES\】CO World He/ritage Sites】 are no exception/. 】It is/ claimed that【 【if the present】 tren/d 】contin/ues, 】oce【ans \could con\tain 】more plastic than fish by 50.\/From bag/s 【to bottles, a/round 13 million tonnes of 【p】lastic flows int\o our oceans eve】ry/ year, acco\rding to a rece/nt UN report. Marine spe/cies ingest or become entangled in plastic de\bris, sometimes cau\s】ing injury or even death. The UN says 100,0/00\ marine animals die each y】ear d\ue to /plastic related causes.On【 many African【 i\slands, /\including the Seychelles, a growing num】/b【er of 【steps】 have bee】n implemented as envi【ro】nm【entalism and tourism ha\ve 】to go hand in hand to protect the /future of th】ese areas.】Click o【n the video【 above to see how】/ \the l\o/cals are abo/ut to s\ave one of the wo/】rld's/ most exclusive \destinations as well as part of 】the /Indian Oc\ean.Share this article】 】 Mo/re from placesJcWt

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5t3HThe cement industry is r\esponsible for between 6 to 8 per \cent of global carbon【【 di【oxid\e emissions.Re\searchers looking 】into how to impro【ve the situation h【ave designe】d 】and built【【\】 an experime】】nt//al plant at a cement fact【ory in Belgi\um to try to \find soluti【ons.The factory, whi【ch covers around 70 hectare【s and employs 】around 1 workers, produces an estimated 1.4 million tonnes of 1/】 /di【fferent varieties of cemen/t from a common r】aw material: /limestone.But【 this 】comes wit/h an en】vironmental cost:/"I/f 【we produce one tonne of cement, we generate 0.6\ tonnes of carbon dioxide/. \This carbon 【dioxide main【ly c\omes from】 our raw m】ater【ial】s," s/ays Ja\n 】Theulen, direct/】or of】 al】ternative resource】s at \Heidelberg 】cement.Therefo/re, we need\ to de/velop】 te\chnologies to capture this c\arbon dioxide so that it is not e【mitted to the env/\ir【onment."The factory \has teamed up 【】with rese【archers from the Europea/【n research project, Leilac (\Low Emissions Intensity Lim】e And Cement)】 to search【 for such 】technolog/\ie\s.The outcome is a 6【0-meter/ high plant wit】h a pi【lot reactor th】at&\acute;'s alre\ady able to a/bsor【\【b 5 per c】ent of t】he f\actory&\acu】】te【;s total carbon dioxide emissi】ons\."【Ther\e is a big metal tube/ that´s heat\ed on t/he\ outside 【at /around【 a 1,000 deg】rees.\ The raw material is dropped in the top an\d it falls slowly d/own/. As this mate】rial】 gets heated,】/ it r/ele/ases its carbon d/ioxide. A\n【d th】is pure carbon dioxide c【an sim/ply be captured a【t the to/p," e】xpla\】in】s Leilac project coordin】ator, Daniel Rennie.Researche/rs say the tech】nology \requires 【minimal /chan【ges i【n the factory】&acut\e;s \con/ventional chain of 】cement production, \enabling the capture 】of ca\rbon dioxid【e with/o\ut additional chemicals.Bu/t there are stil】/l differ/ent【 challenges】 th\at need to be addressed."The materi】al /has to be【 able to flow 】do\wn the re】actor. It f】lows down the\ rea/ctor/, b】ut】/ then at the bottom, it n\eeds/ to be co/nveyed \i/n】to the o【th】er units /on sit\e," sa】y/s T/homas Hills, a process engineer, at Calix."T/he 】other/\ impo/rtant technical/ par/amet】ers are ensur\i【ng tha【t we get enough heat into】 the reacto【r and that we put this h【eat in t【h/e right places."The a/i】\m is to be ab】le 】to absorb as mu\ch carb】on 【diox\ide as possible in the safest, m/ost【/ en【erg】y-efficient way.Researc\hers n】eed to constantly assess the safety and efficiency of the whole/【 proce/ss \bo\th】 【\i【\n a co/ntroll/ed laboratory environment and in the\ reactor its\elf\."We take the powder 【befor】e it /go/\es in and measure t/he amount o【f c\arbon dioxide t【hat goes in】 it,"】 】says Hills."Then we measure after pass\ing throu/gh the 【reactor, and we measure【 【that amount of \c/arbon dioxi【de in the powder. And the di/】【ffer】ence is t//he amount \that we cap【tur【e."Researchers\ are now working 】to scale up the tec【hnology 】to captu\re 95 p】er】 cent of the fact/ory´s global carbon dioxide emissio】ns with a view to dev】elopi\ng other circular【 economy 】business models."Be/caus/e we 】are expecting very pure carbon dioxi\de to 】【be cap【tu/red, with】 some purification steps it can /【be/ used for the foo\d industry, it// can \be used for /growing/ plants, it【 can be used for helping /make n】ew fuels, /it can even 【be used in/ m【aterials to help build new prod【ucts【, " says Daniel】 Rennie.\Researchers be【liev\e the t\echn/olog/y can contr\i【bute to reaching the target of 80% re\duction in 【car\bon dioxide emissions i/n Eu】rope by 2050.Journalist name • Ka\ty Dar【t/for/dShare this 】articleCopy/paste the articl】e video embed link below】:Co【pyShareTweetShar【/esendSh【areTwe】etSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【】are】ShareSh\a】r\eSendShareShar【eY】o】u might also like \ 【 / 】 \ How to increase bio/div/ersity acros】s cities / \ \ \ 】 \ 】 N【e【【w windturbines for green e【ne【rg【/y, che】ape【r a】nd \quicker to build 】 More a】boutIndustry】New technologiesE\n/vir【onmental protec/tion 】 \ Most viewe/d / W\/hat i\nfluence on \climate is the coronavirus lockdown really ha\ving【【?【 【 【 \ Th【\e ne【w AI system safeguarding prema【ture bab/ies from infect【ion / 】 】 /】 【 Messenger RNA: \the molecul【e \that /may teach 】o】ur bodies to beat \cancer / 【 / \ 【Apple an】d Google say t】hey'll work together to trace s【pre【ad /of coron\avi/rus via smartphones 【\ 】 【】 How EU funding is changing the f/ace of Latvia【n innovat/ion 【【 \ Browse today/'s 】ta/gsE1dP

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1kZcHow to become a 【】more sustain\able\ me【at eater28Mf

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m8KxA/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tagsDHrL

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KnSXText sizeAaAaOn 】the】 one hand, one of 【the bigg\est environmen/tal issues in the European\ Uni【on\ is how to reduc//e food wast\e and t【ackling issues around water【 s【carcity across the 【supp/ly chain.In the UK alone, food/ waste is e/\stimated to have the【 【value of more than £20 bi\llion (equ\al to &e】uro;.78 billion - approximately the GD】P of Cyprus) 【a year, s\ays UK ch【ar【ity WR】】AP.On 【the【 other/ hand, textil/es acco\unt for】 a 【/quarter/ of the environmental pollution in the region.So when it come\s to\ s【ustainable clothing, foo/d can play an impor】tant role, and /the\re ar】e already some outstanding 【examples 】out there starting from an innovative natural textile made from pineapple leaf 【&\#642;bre to ma】king\ \milk fibre.Th\e latter i】s made 【from high concentrations of casein, a milk prote\in. In fact】, /the【 techn【i\q\ue is not /ne/w. \In the 】&l】squo;30s, I】talian ch【【emist and/ e【ngineer An/tonio Fer\retti came up wi【th/ the idea 【and patented it under t】he】 na\me, L/anital\. Howeve/r, \the m\arket so\on mov\ed on to cheaper/ synthetics.It【alian fashion/【 designer An/tonella Bellina dusted off this old /tech/n/ique for her new ran】ge.Cl【ick on the vid/eo and \see how /she make\s fabric out o【f milk in T【usca】ny.\Share】 this【 ar/tic【l/e / More from 【styleGIOA

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ZcCFText /s【izeAaAaF【\r/om climat\e change to deforestation,pollution/to t\heloss\ of biodiversit\y, the biggest threats 【to the environment come with a growing awareness and a new willingness to embrace 】moreeco-friendly solutions. 【We】 collected five inspiring examples from around the world.One of th\e\ 】】things that got scie】ntis【ts worried is that/ swarms /of summer bugs seem to be a thing\ of 【】the past. In /the US【, ma/ny states are trying to /stop thei】r /decline. Maryl】】and\ came u/p wit【/】】h an id\ea whic【h already \proved itself, howev】e【r, for\ s【o\me\,\ it might seem to /be contr\o\versial.Another good \examp【le is the tin【y Greek island of T/il【os, which i/s soon to go completely off-grid as i/t benefits 【from the joint \initiative of t/he U/ni【ve/rsity /of\ Ea/st Anglia and the Unive/rsity o/f Applied \Sciences in Pira【eus. T【ilos\ i/s known as 】a green isl/and, pop\ular】 with hik【ers and 【bir【dwatchers, an【d most of the island \is now a protect】ed nature reserve.London is 【an es】peci\ally inspir/ing place fo\r those 【appl【ying eco-fr【ien\】dly solutio\ns, such as this】 classy【 hotel in th【//e heart 【of London, which has created a /natural 】【habitat/【 for wildlife,】】 or this s/tart-up coming up w【ith what's claimed to be 】the wor\l【d's first intelligent【 biological ai】r filter.2018 has\ seen【 some great ad【van【ces in green technology, click 【on \t】he v】i/d/】eo t/o learn mo】re about our selec\ti【on.Share this a\rticle More f\ro】m p【lacesBINJ

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eh6FAl\uis/io Sa/m\pa】io Dos Santos i【n Braz/il, Nixo】n Mutis in Colombia】, Ag\udo// Quill【io in the Philip】pines, Rah\】mat Hakimin/ia in Iran.These a【re s【ome of t】he 164 peopl\e /who los/t th/eir lives for d【e\fe\ndi/ng the environ】ment f】ro\m 'menacing industries' in 2018, said a human rights NGO\.That’s【\ mo\re than three people murdered on average ea】\ch 】week, according to a new \repor【t by UK-based Global Witness rele\ased on【 T/uesday.The 】P】h【ilippi/nes had【 the hig\hest number of\/ /kill/ings o\f any count【ry with at leas【t 30 environment d\efe/nders m/\urdered i【n【/ 2018. This is th】e fir【/st time the\ Asian Pac/ific country is at the t\op 】/of\ the lis】/t\ since the NGO reporting such deaths in 2012.Guatemala\ /recor】ded the sharp\e【st ri【se in murders, which【 jumped more than five-fold — m/aking it】 the deadl【/iest 】country pe】r capita.Europe continues to】 be the less af】fected contine\nt with only three \repor【ted deat】hs/, all of them in 】Uk\raine.Increase in killings relat\ed to conflicts over wat\erIn the【 /9 \cou/ntri【es \surveyed, m】ining was linked to 43 】deaths\. Attacks i\n the ag【/ribusiness sect【or were the se/cond cause of d】eat【h (21 \murders). There was a/ four-fold incr/ease in k【illings related to conflicts over/ w\ater/ in 2018 (17/ \murd/ers)/, underli】ning/ the dead\ly cons\eque】nces of warmer tempera/tures, erratic ra】infall【 and【 d/\iminishing groundwater, parti【cularly i】n Latin A】mer/ica, Africa and South】 Asia】, said the report.The a/tt\acks were connected to\ opposition to/ proliferating hydropower projects, as\ well as corruption in the management of local wa/ter 【sources, Alice Harrison, a ca/mpaigner at【【 Global W】itness, told the Th【oms\on Re/ute】rs Foundation."With climate【 b\rea\kdown and in/creasing【 dro/ught, it is【 hi\】ghly likely that \we'll be【gin to see a 【【rise in co】nflicts over water sources involving 】【w【hoever controls them," s/he added【.Duterte'】s reign\ of terrorHarrison poi/nted ou/t that muc【h of t\he persecution of land defenders was driv/en by the 【demand for land a\nd 】raw materials found in everyda【y prod/ucts, "from fo\od to mobile phones, to jewel【le【ry"."This tr【end on\ly/ \looks 】set to wor【sen as strongmen poli【ticians around the w【o【r\ld【 are stripping away environmental and human r/ights protections to pr】o】mo】te busi/nes】s at any cost," 【she said in a stat【ement.N【earl\y 300 farmers, indigenous people and human r/i【g\hts a\ctivists hav【e\ b】【een kill\e【d si【nce Philippine P\resident 】】【Rodrigo Duterte took o】ff/ice in 2016, accor【ding to Philippine human righ\ts group】s.“The Duterte re/gime/'s inte【nsified militarisation of communit/ies has had cata】s【t/rophic effects," said\ Cristina】【 Palabay,【 secr】】【e\tary-general of lan】【d \right\s group\ Kar【apatan."The exp/anded【 power /given to the police】 a/nd 】the m】】【ilitary has \suppr/essed diss【ent and promoted threa/ts, h/arassment and /attacks a/ga\inst acti\vists a/nd】 human rights defende【rs," sh\e said.Intimidat【i】on of environmental defenders on the riseWhi\le there were fewer deaths re】ported than i】n 2017 (207 in /17) Global Wi【tness also reco/rded the i【\ncreasing use of 【lawsuits, a\rrests/, and\ /death threat【s to【 intimid】ate 【ac】tivists 】】even in develo】ped countries.The\ re】port 【takes t/he\ case of Iran where environmental defe/nders are cons【idere【d to be】 te【/rrorist/s \or 【enemies/ of the state, citing t\he case】 of nine \activists i\mpr】isoned on spyi\ng\ cha/rges.Global Witness also note】d the \repression of anti-fracki\ng protests in the UK】\】 by \changing so\me national laws to ban cer\ta\/in demonstrations.The \NGO called out the rol】e of investors — li】ke development 【banks — play in facilitating the violati】on of\ activis\ts' rights to protest.S\ha】re this articleShareTweetSharesendShareTweetShare【send/MoreHide【ShareS】【e/n//dShareShareShareSendShareSh\ar\eYou m\igh/\t also like / 【 \ Watc【\h: Farmers create 【natural straw intend to break plastic�】39;s back \ \ / 【 / 】 EU's youngest com】m【issi\o/ner on how to turn cli/mate crisis around 【 / / / \ 】 】 'Inc【redible win for n】ature】9;: Plans】 to drill in Great/ Australi【an Bight abandoned 】 】 More aboutE/nviro【nme【ntEnvironmental pr】ot\ectionEnvironme】ntal \i/ssues \ \ B【row\se today�/39;s tagsDc3H

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XnYe\Te】xt sizeAaAa/A s\how【case of t】ho/usands of completel\y sustainable f\abrics is co】ming to London, or】ganiser The Sustainable【 Angle has announced.【The not-for-profit o/r/g/anisation has been a rele】ntl】\ess/ 【s【upporter of innovative/ lower\ carbon solutions to fashio/n&rsquo【;s biggest problems【 since 2010 and hopes that this/ \ev/ent 】will encourag/e ev/en/ more /designe】】rs and creators【 to adopt 】respo/n【sible solutions.】This will \be the ninth e/dit】ion of the Fut】ure Fabrics Expo which is the l\argest sho【wcase of sustainable fabrics of its k】ind. /With each f\abr【ic, informa/tion about where it has com/e from and 】/the/ environm\e/nta【l footpri/nt\ of【 its】 manufacture w\il/l be/【 provided. I【ncreas【ing tr\an/sparency in【 how our clothing i/s made is on】e\ way to he/lp bot【h designers and co【nsumers to 【make responsi\ble choice【s.Materials /o\n show will】 include 】the i/ncreas\i【ngly popular TENCEL Lyoce\ll and Modal as well as【 several fa/brics th】at take an innovative approach to post-cons【】umer recycling. Wi\th fashion waste /firm【ly in】 【the spotl【igh【t this season, there is a real dri【ve from /\consum】ers towa/rd more circular soluti【ons\】.These m\ode【rn approa\】ches will be e/xhibited alongside co/mpanies that ch】ampion t/rad\it\ional sustainable ma】te/rials/ like line/n and bast. Although less common i/n modern designs, these ancient f【】ab/rics are biodeg】radable and water-efficient. 【The plant fi【b【res fr】om 【】【whi】ch\ they are grown can ev\/en sequester C【O/ from the atmosphere.Founders of the expo, 】The【 Su】stainable Angle, hope t】o change the fash/ion i】ndustry \for the bet/ter s【o that, instea/d of stri】ppin/g resources an/】d p/oll\uting environments, \it can【 have a 】po/sit/i/ve impa【ct on n\ature an\/d the communities that 】\make o】ur cloth/es.Read/ More | W\【hat is Tencel? \T//h【e s\ustainable fabric e/v【eryone is 】talking /aboutClaire\ Bergk/am\p, Global Director of S【us【ta】inability and Innovation, Stella McCartney (left) in/ 【convers\ation/ with Orsol/a de Castro, Co-foun】der of Fashion Revolution】 (right)【\.Suzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustaina】\ble AngleAs well as showing off materials th\at designers can u】se t】o /decrease the e】nviro】nmental impact of t\heir own 【de】signs, the F/uture】 F【abrics\ Expo will also h【o\st panels to h\elp】/ ed/ucate atte\n】de/es and fac\ilitate discussion between industry exp【e【rts. Panels for\ the ninth Future F【abrics Expo will b/e】 focus\ed around r【egenera】t\i】ve, circul/ar ap】proaches to sust\ainable des【ign and how fashion can be a “powerful force /for positive change”.Future\【/ Fashion ExpoS\uzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustainable AngleAt 】a /p】an/el at last 【year’s event, Claire Bergkamp, Glob/al Director of Susta】】】inability and \Innovatio】n at Stella\ McCart/ney emphasised t\he value【 of eve\nts like t\his i】n helping to eradicate unsustainable mat】er\ial\s from t【he【 fashion in【du\/stry; “We have to \repl/ace them with i/nnova】t\ive, sustainable alternatives. The o/】ther half of inno】vati】on in the【】 future of fabrics has to be about rethinkin】g t【he syst】em【s 【tha】t we /have now…/【How can we find lower-im【pact ways o\f【】 】creating things?”.Part of the /Expo last year al】】so in【cluded two curated areas dedic\ated to fashion bra\nds fully embraci\ng responsib/le s】our\cing and circularity in thei【/r 【collections. New collaborati/on/s【 between leading designers and companies c/reating inno】vative new material\ technologies are the ideal outcome from this event.Suzanne Plunkett /The 】Sustainable A】ngle【The \【event will take place from the 29th-3】0th Januar/y 2020 at\ Victoria House, Bloomsbur\y Square, 】L】ondon. Tick/et registratio/n f/or de【【signers/ and brands /can be/ found h\er【e.Share this article \ 】More /from l\ifefOlZ

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HOJmText /s【izeAaAaF【\r/om climat\e change to deforestation,pollution/to t\heloss\ of biodiversit\y, the biggest threats 【to the environment come with a growing awareness and a new willingness to embrace 】moreeco-friendly solutions. 【We】 collected five inspiring examples from around the world.One of th\e\ 】】things that got scie】ntis【ts worried is that/ swarms /of summer bugs seem to be a thing\ of 【】the past. In /the US【, ma/ny states are trying to /stop thei】r /decline. Maryl】】and\ came u/p wit【/】】h an id\ea whic【h already \proved itself, howev】e【r, for\ s【o\me\,\ it might seem to /be contr\o\versial.Another good \examp【le is the tin【y Greek island of T/il【os, which i/s soon to go completely off-grid as i/t benefits 【from the joint \initiative of t/he U/ni【ve/rsity /of\ Ea/st Anglia and the Unive/rsity o/f Applied \Sciences in Pira【eus. T【ilos\ i/s known as 】a green isl/and, pop\ular】 with hik【ers and 【bir【dwatchers, an【d most of the island \is now a protect】ed nature reserve.London is 【an es】peci\ally inspir/ing place fo\r those 【appl【ying eco-fr【ien\】dly solutio\ns, such as this】 classy【 hotel in th【//e heart 【of London, which has created a /natural 】【habitat/【 for wildlife,】】 or this s/tart-up coming up w【ith what's claimed to be 】the wor\l【d's first intelligent【 biological ai】r filter.2018 has\ seen【 some great ad【van【ces in green technology, click 【on \t】he v】i/d/】eo t/o learn mo】re about our selec\ti【on.Share this a\rticle More f\ro】m p【lacesk9u8

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